Yoga for Pain Practitioner Resources

This page is accessible to Yoga for Pain Practitioners. It offers additional resources for ongoing learning, not available to the public.

Congratulations on continuing your work as a Yoga for Pain Practitioner. These resources are provided for free as part of your membership to help you deliver high quality work and stay connected with the community.

STAY CONNECTED

Join the private Yoga for Pain Practitioner Facebook group to ask questions and share resources. Guidelines at the top of the page will help you get the most out of the group.

YOGA FOR PAIN PRACTITIONER MEDIA TOOLKIT

The Yoga for Pain Practitioner media toolkit helps you educate (other) healthcare providers and people with pain about your work, build a contact database and marketing plan, and provide better services that meet the needs of your community. Items with links are ready for you to download or access.

  1. Guide to using the toolkit (Download pdf)
  2. Letter of introduction (for yoga teachers) (Access template)
  3. Letter of introduction (for health professionals)
  4. Media release template
  5. Podcast: getting numbers is classes (Listen to the 10 minute mp4)
  6. Tips and tricks for social media and customer research (Media toolkit tips and tricks)

 

 

 

 

EXCERPTS FROM YOGA FOR PAIN PRACTITIONER HANDBOOK (PERSONAL USE ONLY)

Schools of yoga and appropriate-ness for pain
An overview of key yoga schools, including historical context, Sanskrit-English translation,
what a class of this name typically looks like in a modern yoga school and benefits, limitations and considerations for people with persistent pain. Read

Sample lesson introduction (Theme: stable and comfortable)
In this lesson we explore sthira sukham asanam. 3-page lesson intro includes ideas for physical practices, yogic techniques and yogic concepts that help students explore steadiness and comfort, in body and mind. Download

PRACTITIONER-SPECIFIC RESOURCES (NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION)

Pain-friendly class criteria
Pain-friendly classes have 4 criteria to be effective. Here are guidelines to help you with challenging students. Open here

Pain Friendly Classes audio recording (mp3 11 mins) explains what distinguishes a “pain-friendly” class from one that is  “all welcome”. Learn why pain-friendly classes are probably the hardest of all to teach.

Student info sheet for pain-friendly classes
This short flyer explains what pain-friendly classes are to help students find the right class, and has a checklist of things they should expect in your classes. Flyer for printing here.

Yoga for Pain Practitioner criteria
This important document describes the requirements for maintaining your listing on the Yoga for Pain register. Read here

Assignment marking guide
For teachers and health practitioners to use as a guide to completing assignments after Yoga for Pain Foundations Training. Access guide here

FRAMEWORKS

4 stages of pain healing
To help practitioners recognise the most appropriate class for students in their pain healing journey. This is available to practitioners who have received induction in this modality. Email for information.

Learn as you go
Template to help you learn and innovate from challenges you and your clients face Learn as you go template.

USEFUL LINKS AND READING MATERIAL
Painful Transitions (the challenge for young people with pain) Report by Curtin University. Access exec summary here. Note recommendations about co-design, cross-sector buy-in and e-health.

Perils of Place (Grattan Report – hotspots of inequality) Note attention to place as a predictor of health and non-health Access here

Make sure you subscribe to the Yoga for Pain Care Australia blog.

CONTRIBUTE

Write a research summary
Practitioners contribute to the industry by summarising research about pain, yoga and related topics. These are published on the Yoga for Pain Care Australia website and social media with your name on it. Choose your own paper to summarise (please email Rachael for guidlines) or choose from one below.

1. Exercise or not to exercise in chronic pain here

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